Mae Engelgeer’s Mod collection photos have been my iPhone wallpaper since I can’t remember when. There’s this simplicity, cosiness and exoticness in these Dutch textile designer works that gives me constant pleasure of looking at. One might wonder why on earth I’m launching this site with the post on this Dutch designer’s works. There’s a certain reason for it. For me it’s much more than just a brand or products you can like (or not). Mae is a perfect example of how beautifully Japan has been influencing minds of European designers. It’s something I’ve been observing for a long time and am absolutely fascinated about. I chose history of the Japanese contacts with the western world as the subject of my master’s thesis on Japanese Studies. As a great fan of interior design, with particular fondness for mid century modern aesthetic I had to dig deeper to discover why 50s feel so Japanese. I soon discovered that there would be no Danish Modernism without Japan, as Japonisme became a catalyst for what we call today mid century modern. Since then I seem to act like Gus Portokalos from ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding’ proving that every European design has Japanese roots. Japonisme not only became my passion but it actually defines my own style in interior design.

What I adore about Mae Engelgeer’s products is the Japanese aesthetic, Scandinavian minimalism, natural materials, craftsmanship, variety of noble colours and – last but not least – this unique ‘muggy’ warm atmosphere that her products bring to the interior. Watching this textile designer’s rugs, plaids and throws I could swear I can smell cedar and incense. It reminds me of the old dark mangle place, me and my mom used to visit on the way to the park when I was little. Even if we had nothing that needed ironing I still had to drop by, even for 1 minute, just to stand and breathe this filthy, warm, dusty air. Below are my favourites from Mae’s different collections. You can see (and buy!) all her works here.


Photo credit goes to mae-engelgeer.nl (including two photos by Iris Dorine)